Wednesday, January 20, 2010

Etiquette of wearing hats at weddings | Dan Johnson Photography Blog









Wedding hat etiquette















Tuesday, December 22, 2009











Posted in Wedding Hats























Today???s burning question is ??? when do you take your hat off at a wedding, or to be more precise, when do ladies take their hats off?  The etiquette at a English wedding is that ladies keep their hats on until the mother of the bride removes hers, which will normally be when the formality of the wedding breakfast is completed and gentlemen are free to remove their jackets i.e. when the coffee comes out.

That???s the theory, which assumes that your mother???s not wearing an enormous creation which makes things difficult for the waiting staff, in which case she should take the thing off when she sits down.

In practice, the rule is to follow the lead of the senior ladies present (normally the mums unless the nobility have turned out for a free meal) and not be surprised if they take theirs off as they go into the marquee or just before they go into the dining room.   Watch out in the ladies loo for the seasoned veteran of many a garden party and wedding.   She???s the older lady who will remove her hat, take out the rollers that are in her hair under it, produce a hairbrush from her handbag and in due course return to the fray with immaculate hair, carrying her hat.

Larger more elaborate fascinators count as hats, and if mum???s going to be signing the register as a witness and/or standing in a receiving line air-kissing for half an hour or more, a hat with a down-turned brim is not a good idea.

Finally, be prepared for guests contacting you or your mum for guidance in the run-up to the wedding when they realise that (a) they need to get a hat and (b) they???re not sure when it comes off ???

ShareThis















































Some useful info for our wedding guests here on Hat ettiquette. Take notes girls!

Etiquette of wearing hats at weddings | Dan Johnson Photography Blog

Wedding hat etiquette

Tuesday, December 22, 2009 Posted in Wedding Hats

Today’s burning question is – when do you take your hat off at a wedding, or to be more precise, when do ladies take their hats off?  The etiquette at a English wedding is that ladies keep their hats on until the mother of the bride removes hers, which will normally be when the formality of the wedding breakfast is completed and gentlemen are free to remove their jackets i.e. when the coffee comes out.
That’s the theory, which assumes that your mother’s not wearing an enormous creation which makes things difficult for the waiting staff, in which case she should take the thing off when she sits down.
In practice, the rule is to follow the lead of the senior ladies present (normally the mums unless the nobility have turned out for a free meal) and not be surprised if they take theirs off as they go into the marquee or just before they go into the dining room.   Watch out in the ladies loo for the seasoned veteran of many a garden party and wedding.   She’s the older lady who will remove her hat, take out the rollers that are in her hair under it, produce a hairbrush from her handbag and in due course return to the fray with immaculate hair, carrying her hat.
Larger more elaborate fascinators count as hats, and if mum’s going to be signing the register as a witness and/or standing in a receiving line air-kissing for half an hour or more, a hat with a down-turned brim is not a good idea.
Finally, be prepared for guests contacting you or your mum for guidance in the run-up to the wedding when they realise that (a) they need to get a hat and (b) they’re not sure when it comes off …
ShareThis
Some useful info for our wedding guests here on Hat ettiquette. Take notes girls!

Monday, January 18, 2010

Sing of the Lord's Goodness

SING OF THE LORD'S GOODNESS

Ernest Sands


Verse 1. Sing of the Lord's goodness Father of all wisdom,
come to him and bless his name.
Mercy he has shown us, his love is forever,
faithful to the end of days.

Refrain: Come, then, all you nations,
sing of your Lord's goodness,
melodies of praise and thanks to God.
Ring out the Lord's glory,
praise him with your music,
worship him and bless his name.

Verse 2. Power he has wielded, honor is his garment
risen from the snares of death.
His word he has spoken, one bread he has broken,
new life he now gives to all.

Verse 3. Courage in our darkness, comfort in our sorrow,
Spirit of our God most high;
solace for the weary, pardon for the sinner,
splendor of the living God.

Verse 4. Praise him with your singing, praise him with the trumpet
praise God with the lute and harp;
praise him with the cymbals, praise him with your dancing,
praise God till the end of days.

Copyright © 1981 by OCP Publications 5536 Hassalo, Portland, OR, 97213. All rights reserved.

I did enjoy singing this on Sunday. It sounded fab in our new worship space.

Posted via web from Alex E Jones

Sing of the Lord's Goodness

SING OF THE LORD'S GOODNESS

Ernest Sands


Verse 1. Sing of the Lord's goodness Father of all wisdom,
come to him and bless his name.
Mercy he has shown us, his love is forever,
faithful to the end of days.

Refrain: Come, then, all you nations,
sing of your Lord's goodness,
melodies of praise and thanks to God.
Ring out the Lord's glory,
praise him with your music,
worship him and bless his name.

Verse 2. Power he has wielded, honor is his garment
risen from the snares of death.
His word he has spoken, one bread he has broken,
new life he now gives to all.

Verse 3. Courage in our darkness, comfort in our sorrow,
Spirit of our God most high;
solace for the weary, pardon for the sinner,
splendor of the living God.

Verse 4. Praise him with your singing, praise him with the trumpet
praise God with the lute and harp;
praise him with the cymbals, praise him with your dancing,
praise God till the end of days.

Copyright ?? 1981 by OCP Publications 5536 Hassalo, Portland, OR, 97213. All rights reserved.

I did enjoy singing this on Sunday. It sounded fab in our new worship space.

Monday, January 11, 2010

Christmas and January

So Tom gave me an exciting camera for Christmas. This has lead to me
taking pictures of pretty much everything.

Media_httpphotosbakfb_bnisg

Christmas in France was interesting. It was my first Christmas away
from home, and my first Christmas without children running around. At
first I wasn't sure if I liked it, but by the end of the day I was
enjoying a whirl of cooking, eating and drinking nice wine like a
grown up. Tom's sister had been given a labrador puppy for Christmas,
and that kept everyone amused for hours, stealing napkins from laps to
shred, and demanding attention.

Media_httpphotosaakfb_aojnh

It had snowed a bit before we arrived, and so the countryside was a
sparkling crispy white for most of our stay. It was bitterly cold, and
when we went to watch the fireworks at a nearby village on Boxing Day
we were sooo cold!

Media_httpphotosdakfb_tbubt

Media_httpphotosgakfb_hehrb

Since we came back from France, apart from going back to work, we went
to a birthday party, a second Christmas with Tom's mum and family, to
an aquarium a new years party at Lula's and my family party, and off
to Gatwick for bowling and a meal for our Best Man's birthday. I had
such fun! Gatwick has had over a foot of snow and we had a great
snowball fight on the way back to the car!

Media_httpphotoscakfb_xiaab

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=7453900&id=286100391

January has mainly been snowy and icy even for us here in
Southampton's micro climate. The last few days have seen the snow turn
into thick layers of ice as the slush melted and frozen again. It is
only just melting now. All the time inside sheltering has seen us
working hard on the Chaplaincy campaign, as we work to get pledges
together for regular donations to the work of the Chaplaincy.

Media_httpphotosdakfb_ihxjo

We have pledges of ??4050 a year in regular donations and ??380 in one
off donations in only a month. We reckon we need about ??10,000 to be
taken seriously by the University and the Church, so we're well on
track. About 1200 people signed the petition, and if each of those
gave just ??6 a year - A YEAR! will provide more than enough.

If you can help us, please go to http://www.savesotonchaplaincy.co.uk

Tom and I have also been planning weddingy things. Last night we were
looking at honeymoon plans, and we are going to be going to Ireland.
We'll fly from Southampton to Dublin, see some sights and then hire a
car and go on a bit of a tour. Nice and relaxing! i also made the
headresses for the bridesmaids. The big things on my to do list are:

getting fabric for the wedding dress and bridesmaids dresses
get underwear and hosiery
sort out wedding rings
sort out a meeting with the various clergy.

Christmas and January

So Tom gave me an exciting camera for Christmas. This has lead to me
taking pictures of pretty much everything.

Christmas in France was interesting. It was my first Christmas away
from home, and my first Christmas without children running around. At
first I wasn't sure if I liked it, but by the end of the day I was
enjoying a whirl of cooking, eating and drinking nice wine like a
grown up. Tom's sister had been given a labrador puppy for Christmas,
and that kept everyone amused for hours, stealing napkins from laps to
shred, and demanding attention.

It had snowed a bit before we arrived, and so the countryside was a
sparkling crispy white for most of our stay. It was bitterly cold, and
when we went to watch the fireworks at a nearby village on Boxing Day
we were sooo cold!

Since we came back from France, apart from going back to work, we went
to a birthday party, a second Christmas with Tom's mum and family, to
an aquarium a new years party at Lula's and my family party, and off
to Gatwick for bowling and a meal for our Best Man's birthday. I had
such fun! Gatwick has had over a foot of snow and we had a great
snowball fight on the way back to the car!

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=7453900&id=286100391

January has mainly been snowy and icy even for us here in
Southampton's micro climate. The last few days have seen the snow turn
into thick layers of ice as the slush melted and frozen again. It is
only just melting now. All the time inside sheltering has seen us
working hard on the Chaplaincy campaign, as we work to get pledges
together for regular donations to the work of the Chaplaincy.

We have pledges of £4050 a year in regular donations and £380 in one
off donations in only a month. We reckon we need about £10,000 to be
taken seriously by the University and the Church, so we're well on
track. About 1200 people signed the petition, and if each of those
gave just £6 a year - A YEAR! will provide more than enough.

If you can help us, please go to http://www.savesotonchaplaincy.co.uk

Tom and I have also been planning weddingy things. Last night we were
looking at honeymoon plans, and we are going to be going to Ireland.
We'll fly from Southampton to Dublin, see some sights and then hire a
car and go on a bit of a tour. Nice and relaxing! i also made the
headresses for the bridesmaids. The big things on my to do list are:

getting fabric for the wedding dress and bridesmaids dresses
get underwear and hosiery
sort out wedding rings
sort out a meeting with the various clergy.

Posted via email from Alex E Jones

Tuesday, January 05, 2010

Fidelia's Sisters: The Good Book

The Good Book

by Elsa A. Peters

While we search for epiphanies after the birth of our salvation,  I'd like to offer a review of a book that I have learned to cherish with my whole heart.  It didn't come naturally.  I had to literally learn to love this book like a fourth grader forced to write a book report.  I couldn't tell you exactly where it clicked or how this book became like an old friend.  I can only tell you that this book -- the one that we call the Bible -- has been a long-time best-seller in America for very good reason. 

It has songs that sing the deepest of human lamentations.  It has stories that speak of impossible hope.  It has parables that can twist around your mind. It has some women that totally contradict the attitude that the Apostle Paul uses to attempt to belittle them -- although those particular epistles weren't actually written by Paul at all. This Good Book even has a few good miracles that make our ordinary god-sightings look plain.

Bible

But, let's review.  This isn't a book filled with simple stories about a God that checked out of the world two thousand years ago.  This book hasn't been shared with friends and neighbors because it was irrelevant to their daily lives.  On the contrary, it has something to say about our lives.  This is a book that forms our faith in each other and in our God. 

I need to repeat that to myself.  I need to remind myself that this is why this book matters to me.  It's not just the strong women or the radical teachings of Jesus or even the fact God created this world to be good that stirs my conviction in this book.  Sure.  I love the stories.  I love the words in this text.  Even when they boil my blood and confuse me, I love these holy words.  I don't care who wrote them.  Okay. I do.  I totally do.  I'm lying.  I care where these words came from.  I care about Biblical literacy as much as Kristin Swenson does, but lately, I find myself wondering more about the people that use these words.  When there are too people using my Good Book to explain things that I don't believe, so I'm trying to remember all of those hands. I'm trying to imagine their papery skin touching this book.  I'm trying to feel the clammy warmth of those that have thumbed through its pages and even notice the dry, winter-chapped skin of those that have studied the words of my Good Book in kitchens and parlors.  I'm thinking about all of those hands from years ago and those connected to the I serve that want these words to make sense.

I'll admit it.  I have a little fire burning in me.  I have a little righteous anger bubbling up because I love these words.  If you were the kind of pastor I am, you would interrupt me right now.  You would gently ask me to describe my anger.  You would sweetly ask, "What does your anger look like?" 

So, I'll tell you.

My anger is red like the ribbons we wore in Maine throughout the summer and into the autumn to demonstrate our hope for marriage equality.  It has tentacles.  I don't know where the tentacles are going or what they touch but it has tentacles because I stood in our state capital and listened to the words I love being used against the people that I love.  I felt the crushing weight of that anger when we lost the campaign to bring marriage equality to my state.  My anger doesn't care that the election is over.  My anger has tentacles that don't  want to go away.  Weeks after the vote against marriage equality, my anger and I boarded a bus to drive all-night from Portland, ME to Washington, DC so that I could tell my own senators not to support any language resembling the Stupak amendment.  Among those pro-choice activists, of which most were young women, I was feared because I wore a collar.  I represented something that they assumed condemned them.

The problem is that Jesus told me to love them.  Jesus told me to love them all -- pro-choice activists, gays, queers, straights, women who have had abortions and the lobbyists that serve them.  My love affair with these words began when I first heard Jesus speak the words in Luke 4:18-19.  I don't remember where I was or who was speaking them.  I only remember how this articulated a salvation I could get my hands on.  Sure, they are just words on a page.  But in that moment, I heard these ordinary words become holy.  They were no longer just words.  They were about the people that I loved -- even if I didn't know them.  These words were holy because they had good news for me and for you. 

So, I'm angry.  I'm angry that these holy words have been hijacked by people that won't even talk to me because I'm a so-called liberal.  I'm angry that there are people that won't look me in the eye when I'm wearing my collar because there are other faith-based voices monopolizing the airwaves.  I'm angry that I have colleagues that don't want to do Bible study together when the sharing of these holy words seems to be the only thing that unites us.

Sigh.

This could just be my tirade.  After all, if you were my pastor, and listened to these words, you might quote St. Francis to me. You would remind me -- as I remind myself -- that sometimes when we preach the gospel, it doesn't require words at all.  And yet, I love these words.  I love them all.  Moreover, I don't want to be angry. I want those words that Jesus read on a scroll to take shape before my very eyes.  It's in this hope that I hope my review goes beyond a tirade.  In this New Year, I'd like to challenge my young clergy women sisters to open our Bibles in uncomfortable settings and talk about these words of hope to people that don't want to hear it.  No matter what, I hope that these words become holy in your our own hands.

Are you an ordained woman under the age of 40? Email youngclergywomen (at) gmail (dot) com to become a member of The Young Clergy Women Project! Members receive access to a password protected online community, monthly e-newsletters, and advance notice of upcoming conferences and events.

The Jesus Review,” January 2010

Identifying and intrigued by this wonderful post I returned to the aforementioned Chapter of Luke:

Luke 4:18-19

18‘The Spirit of the Lord is upon me,
because he has anointed me
to bring good news to the poor.
He has sent me to proclaim release to the captives
and recovery of sight to the blind,
to let the oppressed go free,
19to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favour.

There is realisation that this is my saviour too. The one who preaches ultimate love has sent me too to love those who need love and set captives free, to advocate for those without a voice.

Posted via web from Alex E Jones

Fidelia's Sisters: The Good Book




The Good Book




by Elsa A. Peters

While we search for epiphanies after the birth of our salvation,  I'd like to offer a review of a book that I have learned to cherish with my whole heart.  It didn't come naturally.  I had to literally learn to love this book like a fourth grader forced to write a book report.  I couldn't tell you exactly where it clicked or how this book became like an old friend.  I can only tell you that this book -- the one that we call the Bible -- has been a long-time best-seller in America for very good reason. 

It has songs that sing the deepest of human lamentations.  It has stories that speak of impossible hope.  It has parables that can twist around your mind. It has some women that totally contradict the attitude that the Apostle Paul uses to attempt to belittle them -- although those particular epistles weren't actually written by Paul at all. This Good Book even has a few good miracles that make our ordinary god-sightings look plain.











Bible

But, let's review.  This isn't a book filled with simple stories about a God that checked out of the world two thousand years ago.  This book hasn't been shared with friends and neighbors because it was irrelevant to their daily lives.  On the contrary, it has something to say about our lives.  This is a book that forms our faith in each other and in our God. 

I need to repeat that to myself.  I need to remind myself that this is why this book matters to me.  It's not just the strong women or the radical teachings of Jesus or even the fact God created this world to be good that stirs my conviction in this book.  Sure.  I love the stories.  I love the words in this text.  Even when they boil my blood and confuse me, I love these holy words.  I don't care who wrote them.  Okay. I do.  I totally do.  I'm lying.  I care where these words came from.  I care about Biblical literacy as much as Kristin Swenson does, but lately, I find myself wondering more about the people that use these words.  When there are too people using my Good Book to explain things that I don't believe, so I'm trying to remember all of those hands. I'm trying to imagine their papery skin touching this book.  I'm trying to feel the clammy warmth of those that have thumbed through its pages and even notice the dry, winter-chapped skin of those that have studied the words of my Good Book in kitchens and parlors.  I'm thinking about all of those hands from years ago and those connected to the I serve that want these words to make sense.

I'll admit it.  I have a little fire burning in me.  I have a little righteous anger bubbling up because I love these words.  If you were the kind of pastor I am, you would interrupt me right now.  You would gently ask me to describe my anger.  You would sweetly ask, "What does your anger look like?" 

So, I'll tell you.

My anger is red like the ribbons we wore in Maine throughout the summer and into the autumn to demonstrate our hope for marriage equality.  It has tentacles.  I don't know where the tentacles are going or what they touch but it has tentacles because I stood in our state capital and listened to the words I love being used against the people that I love.  I felt the crushing weight of that anger when we lost the campaign to bring marriage equality to my state.  My anger doesn't care that the election is over.  My anger has tentacles that don't  want to go away.  Weeks after the vote against marriage equality, my anger and I boarded a bus to drive all-night from Portland, ME to Washington, DC so that I could tell my own senators not to support any language resembling the Stupak amendment.  Among those pro-choice activists, of which most were young women, I was feared because I wore a collar.  I represented something that they assumed condemned them.

The problem is that Jesus told me to love them.  Jesus told me to love them all -- pro-choice activists, gays, queers, straights, women who have had abortions and the lobbyists that serve them.  My love affair with these words began when I first heard Jesus speak the words in Luke 4:18-19.  I don't remember where I was or who was speaking them.  I only remember how this articulated a salvation I could get my hands on.  Sure, they are just words on a page.  But in that moment, I heard these ordinary words become holy.  They were no longer just words.  They were about the people that I loved -- even if I didn't know them.  These words were holy because they had good news for me and for you. 

So, I'm angry.  I'm angry that these holy words have been hijacked by people that won't even talk to me because I'm a so-called liberal.  I'm angry that there are people that won't look me in the eye when I'm wearing my collar because there are other faith-based voices monopolizing the airwaves.  I'm angry that I have colleagues that don't want to do Bible study together when the sharing of these holy words seems to be the only thing that unites us.

Sigh.

This could just be my tirade.  After all, if you were my pastor, and listened to these words, you might quote St. Francis to me. You would remind me -- as I remind myself -- that sometimes when we preach the gospel, it doesn't require words at all.  And yet, I love these words.  I love them all.  Moreover, I don't want to be angry. I want those words that Jesus read on a scroll to take shape before my very eyes.  It's in this hope that I hope my review goes beyond a tirade.  In this New Year, I'd like to challenge my young clergy women sisters to open our Bibles in uncomfortable settings and talk about these words of hope to people that don't want to hear it.  No matter what, I hope that these words become holy in your our own hands.

Are you an ordained woman under the age of 40? Email youngclergywomen (at) gmail (dot) com to become a member of The Young Clergy Women Project! Members receive access to a password protected online community, monthly e-newsletters, and advance notice of upcoming conferences and events.










???The Jesus Review,??? January 2010



Identifying and intrigued by this wonderful post I returned to the aforementioned Chapter of Luke:

Luke 4:18-19

18???The Spirit of the Lord is upon me,
because he has anointed me
to bring good news to the poor.
He has sent me to proclaim release to the captives
and recovery of sight to the blind,
to let the oppressed go free,
19to proclaim the year of the Lord???s favour.

There is realisation that this is my saviour too. The one who preaches ultimate love has sent me too to love those who need love and set captives free, to advocate for those without a voice.

Monday, January 04, 2010

Some Cheerier #savesotonchap news

Want some cheery news? Students, alumni and friends have so far pledged ??3630 a year towards the cost of their Chaplain! That's 17% of what we need a year. We're working with lots of ecumenical partners to see if we can increase that to 67% of what we need, which is a great figure.

So if some of you could pledge to donate even ??2 a month we'd be even closer to the target goal.

Can you pledge to donate to keep chaplaincy running ? http://sites.google.com/site/savesouthamptonchaplaincy/can-you-donate-to-keep...

We're working hard on setting up our Association bank account so if we need to, we can make these pledges real money to pay for the great work Chaplaincy does if we need them.

Some Cheerier #savesotonchap news

Want some cheery news? Students, alumni and friends have so far pledged £3630 a year towards the cost of their Chaplain! That's 17% of what we need a year. We're working with lots of ecumenical partners to see if we can increase that to 67% of what we need, which is a great figure.

So if some of you could pledge to donate even £2 a month we'd be even closer to the target goal.

Can you pledge to donate to keep chaplaincy running ? http://sites.google.com/site/savesouthamptonchaplaincy/can-you-donate-to-keep-chaplaincy-running

We're working hard on setting up our Association bank account so if we need to, we can make these pledges real money to pay for the great work Chaplaincy does if we need them.

Posted via email from Alex E Jones